Pinkpop featured on Hollands Glorie

Pinkpop featured on Hollands Glorie

Pinkpop featured on Hollands Glorie

by Images for the Future

An experimental video searching machine was launched to mark the fortieth anniversary of the Pinkpop Festival (now offline). Using special technology developed in the Netherlands, users could access the website to browse through video excerpts of performances and interviews from Pinkpop. Automatic image and voice recognition provided users with state-of-the-art assistance. The website offered a sneak preview of how the multimedia technology of the near future will help users navigate the enormous wealth of online video.

During the last five years, the Dutch technology used has been often rated the best in international competitions and was now available to a wider public for the very first time. The search engine can convert pixels into text, enabling it to label objects in the image automatically, such as ‘guitarist’ and ‘drummer’. The engine uses numerous examples to learn the connection between the visual objects and thousands of formal, colour and structural features. Users were able to home in on a variety of different named objects in the concert video with the aid of a specially developed video player that presents the objects on a timeline. In addition to searching through Pinkpop concerts, users could also search through interviews with Dutch artists, assisted by automatic voice recognition software.

Users were invited to provide active feedback on the automatic results, for example by replacing the label ‘drummer' with the word ‘keyboard player’. This input from the users could then be used in order to further enhance the automatic recognition process. Users were also able to add text comments making the resources from Pinkpop even easier to search.

The website www.hollandsglorieoppinkpop.nl was developed as part of the national research programme MultimediaN and Images for the Future. MultimediaN is an alliance involving the University of Amsterdam (video image recognition), the University of Twente (voice recognition), Video Dock (video players) and the Netherlands Institute of Sound and Vision.