Project

General information

The archives of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (Sound and Vision) in Hilversum, of EYE in Amsterdam, and of the National Archive in The Hague contain the visual history of the past 100 years. Films, documentaries, radiobroadcast, and television programmes comprise more than 700.000 hours worth of material. The costs for creating this oeuvre have run into the billions. The educational, cultural, and economical value of this material is unprecedented.
Project

Goal

Saving and making available important Dutch audiovisual heritage of the 20th century. Images for the Future is innovating, which will benefit the heritage sector and makes the Netherlands an international forefront of digitization of cultural heritage.
Project

Organisation

Information about de consortium partners responsible for the project Images for the Future. Images for the Future is a project by EYE Film Institute Netherlands, Dutch Institute for Sound and Vision, National Archives and Knowledgeland.
Project

Background

The archives of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (Sound and Vision) in Hilversum, of EYE in Amsterdam, and of the National Archive in The Hague contain the visual history of the past 100 years. The educational, cultural, and economical value of this material is unprecedented. Two obstacles stand in the way of silvering this wealth.
Project

Activities

Images for the Future’s activities can be seen as a chain: the next step can only be taken when the current one has been worked through and completed. We distinguish between the following links in the project: 1.Restoring and preserving 2. Digitizing collections 3. Adding meta-data 4. Making arrangements with copyright holders 5. Contextualizing the collections 6. Channeling content through services and distribution towards the end user
Project

Making available and target groups

The archives of Sound and Vision, EYE, and the National Archive store an enormous amount of interesting, moving, historical, important, rare, and unknown material. Our national audiovisual heritage is contained by kilometers of storing shelves, bunkers, cellars, and safes. When a large part of these archives is digitized, these visual historical gems will be released. They will be given a new life, as educational material, as input for television programs, as web applications, as games, or as en (...)